A railway bridge is located in Lower Silesia over Pilchowickie Lake. The bridge was first opened in 1909 to service connections between Żagań and Jelenia Góra. It is 151-metre high and was built on two sandstone pillars, suspended 40-meters over the Pilchowickie Lake. 

 

McQuarrie explained the whole confusion in an exclusive article for Empire: ‘Last week, a story broke in the press alleging that the producers of Mission: Impossible had asked for permission to demolish a 111-year-old bridge in Poland and that, in so doing, we were destroying a piece of that wonderful country’s heritage in the name of entertainment.’

 

‘There was never a plan to blow up a 111-year-old protected monument.’ – wrote McQuarrie. 

 

Moreover, the director pinpointed that ‘Mission: Impossible has come to be known as a franchise that does as much as humanly possible without the use of digital effects’. This procedure allows ‘to create the moment in a way that audiences have never seen before’. The rough concept involved (spoiler) a partially destroyed bridge. 

 

The director finished by stressing that never, under any circumstances, would his production team seek to harm any cultural objects. 

 

‘To respect and celebrate the places we film is our prime directive. No one involved in the production asked for permission to destroy a historically significant landmark in Poland’ – concluded the director Christopher McQuarrie.