Solar eclipses occur when the Moon moving around the Earth finds itself in the Sun-Earth line of sight. It is then on a new moon, but because its orbit is not perfectly circular and has a certain inclination relative to the plane of the Earth's orbit around the sun, eclipses do not occur at every new moon.

The most spectacular are total eclipses, when the entire solar disk is covered and then we see the solar corona all around. In the event that part of the disk remains visible, it is called a partial eclipse. There are also so-called annular eclipses, and it is this category of the eclipse that will fall on Thursday 10 June. In an annular eclipse, the entire Moon obscures the Sun, but the Moon is too far from our planet and the angular size of its disc visible in the sky is smaller than the size of the Sun's disc. In this situation, you can see a bright ring around the dark disk of the Moon.